clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
Half a rack of ribs on a white plate
Agave lime ribs at Birdcage
Liz Attaway

The 15 Hottest New Restaurants Around Atlanta, February 2024

From a new Latin spot in Grant Park to an omakase-style, underground supper club and a wine bar in a beer garden

View as Map
Agave lime ribs at Birdcage
| Liz Attaway

New restaurants debut on the dining scene every month, both inside and outside the perimeter, but some establishments hit the ground running right out of the gate and stand out above the rest. These are the new restaurants generating serious buzz at the moment among avid Atlanta diners. While the Eater 38 highlights Atlanta restaurant institutions, old standbys, and neighborhood essentials, this map spotlights the new places people are flocking to right now. Here are the new restaurants and pop-ups to check out this month around Atlanta.

For all the latest Atlanta dining intel, subscribe to Eater Atlanta's newsletter.

Read More
Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Owens and Hull at Grand Champion

Copy Link

Backed by pitmasters Robert Owens and Secret Pint BBQ owner Bryan Hull, and located in what was the Smyrna location of Grand Champion BBQ, Owens and Hull merges Texas- and Carolina-style barbecue smoked over Georgia oak on the menu. And the restaurant is already generating serious buzz amongst barbecue enthusiasts in Atlanta. Owens and Hull doesn’t feature a set menu of barbecue standards, but rather a specific menu served each day. This includes a smoked burger topped with White Castle onions and American cheese on Thursdays, reserving sliced brisket and turkey for service on Fridays and Saturdays, and regularly serving the popular sausages from Secret Pint’s pop-ups (Think sausages stuffed cheddar cheese and jalapenos or roasted poblano peppers and Oaxaca cheese.) Only open Thursday through Sunday, expect weekly specials, too, and a rotating selection of side dishes.

Platter of Brunswick stew, sliced brisket and turkey, white bread, and sausage links. Owens and Hull

Bovino After Dark @ Hop City West End

Copy Link

Located inside the bar at Hop City in West End, this underground supper club comes from former Gunshow chef Chris McCord and bartender and butcher Alex Sher. The intimate chefs counter experience seats between 10 and 12 people, offering five courses served omakase style, with optional wine and caviar pairings (You’ll want both.) Sher serves as host and sommelier, which helps give Bovino After Dark a dinner party vibe among the strangers seated at the bar. It also allows McCord to work his magic while diners watch in anticipation of the next course. Think courses of Funyun funnel cake over watermelon granita and Manchester quail stuffed with farro verde garnished with crispy pecans. Dessert offers playful takes on the final course of the meal, including tres leches and persimmon bread pudding topped with trifoliate ice cream drizzled with candy roaster caramel. With limited seating available for dinner on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights, reservations are gobbled up fast. But those who stalk Bovino After Dark’s Instagram feed can often snag last-minute reservations due to cancellations. $65 per person. Wine pairings and caviar optional for an additional charge. Reservations required.

Beth McKibben

Little Sparrow and Bar Blanc

Copy Link

Backed by Ford Fry, the name Little Sparrow refers to French singer Edith Piaf — an affectionate nickname given to the songstress due to her diminutive stature. She was also the lover of French boxer Marcel Cerdan, who is the inspiration behind the name of Fry’s steakhouse at Westside Provisions District. Order the Le Petit Martini to start, described as a “small yet truly exceptional ice-cold” drink made with either gin or vodka. Next, order a bowl of French onion soup with a thick layer of bruleed cheese or some crispy frites drizzled with cheese sauce, part of the restaurant’s raclette service. Move on to steak hache or the poitrine de porc (pork belly) with fennel, apple, and jus. The poulet frites stuffed with black truffles and brioche is prepared table side, as are desserts like the creme caramel, Basque-style cheesecake, and cherries jubilee. Cocktails come with a French bistro twist, too, such as a take on the Manhattan in the Pigalle with bourbon and calvados. Upstairs at Bar Blanc, expect cocktails, a French-leaning wine list, and a prix-fixe menu at $49.50 per person of steak frites, salad, and bread for the table within a date-worthy, intimate space. The bar here also serves the multi-layered digestif Pousse Cafe (“push coffee” in French) — a colorful 19th-century layered shot of liqueurs meant to aid in digestion. Reservations encouraged for Little Sparrow. Bar Blanc walk-ins only.

Poulet frites with crispy fries and a martini from Little Sparrow in Atlanta. Little Sparrow

Pata Negra Mezcaleria

Copy Link

Eagle-eyed Eater readers spotted a trend last year in Atlanta: the rise of upscale Mexican restaurants like Oaxaca centered on regional cuisines opening around the metro area. That trend continues with Pata Negra Mezcaleria restaurant and mezcal bar, which took over the former the Usual space at the Arya apartment complex on Peachtree Street in November 2023. Expect a menu of dishes easily shared, like crispy tlayudas loaded with black beans, Oaxaca cheese, avocado and chapulines and a trio of enmoladas drizzled with smoky mole. Order entrees of tender pulpo served atop squid ink and salsa matcha or a whole branzino dressed with chilis, tomatillos, and peppers. Sip on cocktails leaning into mezcal and other agave spirits, such as the restaurant’s namesake cocktail made with blanco tequila and Banhez Espadín-Barril mezcal, sage, palo santo, and lemon. Open for lunch and dinner. Brunch begins soon.

Pata Negra Mezcaleria

Southern National

Copy Link

The opening of Southern National is a homecoming for owners chef Duane Nutter and Reggie Washington, who worked together for years at One Flew South at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, before departing the city in 2016. They would go on to open Southern National in Mobile, Alabama, (Washington’s hometown) but hinted at a return to Atlanta. The partners officially closed the Mobile location in 2022 to relocate the restaurant to Summerhill. Food leans into Nutter’s travels in the Northwest, Kentucky, and Louisiana, where he was born, as well as the South and Atlanta. The menu features a few of the Mobile location’s most popular dishes, like the mussels and collard greens, along with several new dishes such as herb butter broiled red fish over smoked turkey smothered green beans and field peas and Creole-cured salmon and potato blini. Look for Nutter to bring his signature sense of humor to the menu, too, in desserts like peanut butter panna cotta topped with chunks of Nutter Butter cookies. Nutter and Washington reunited with two longtime friends and former colleagues in Southern National, partnering with Ticonderoga Club owners and critically acclaimed bartenders Greg Best and Paul Calvert, who developed the cocktail program for the restaurant. Reservations encouraged.

Southern National

Brush Sushi

Copy Link

Critically acclaimed restaurant Brush Sushi reopened in the former American Cut space at Buckhead Village in August, after closing last year in Decatur ahead of a planned relocation to a larger space. Unlike in Decatur, which included several izakaya-style dishes, the Buckhead location centers on a la carte sushi and prix fixe sushi options, along with grilled dishes cooked over Binchotan charcoal. The modern, elegant design in Buckhead is set off by large wooden panels featuring intricate carvings of hinoki (a Japanese cypress tree), with a private dining room offering more intimate omakase tastings led by chef and owner Jason Liang. Look for both classic and original cocktails from the bar, an expanded Japanese whisky selection, and a broader focus on sake in Buckhead. Open for lunch and dinner. Reservations encouraged.

Jamestown Properties

Long Snake Wine Bar

Copy Link

After taking over the kitchen at Whoopsie’s on Wednesday nights for three months, the forthcoming wine bar from former 8ARM beverage director Josh Fryer landed a longterm residency in the Georgia Beer Garden space. Named for the PJ Harvey song “Long Snake Moan”, Fryer brings together his love of music, natural wine, and food in dishes like grilled quail with a muscadine-sage gastrique, smashed summer salad dressed with orange blossom vinaigrette, and whole roasted Virginia croaker served with a creamy watercress salad. Look for desserts like lavender chess pie. With good tunes spinning on the turntable, seasonal dishes using fresh, local ingredients, and a solid bottle list boasting funky finds, Long Snake has already become a go-to for Atlanta wine lovers. Thursday - Saturday, 6 p.m. to 12 a.m. Snack menu available in the garden. Dinner menu only available in the dining room and at the bar.

Birdcage

Copy Link

Adjacent to Firepit Pizza Tavern at Larkin on Memorial, “Cutthroat Kitchen” winner Leslie Cohen, and Shaun Whitmer’s Birdcage serves up Latin cuisine at a more-than-decent price point. Devised by Whitmer, the food side is no-nonsense, with an array of items like Michelada shrimp cocktail, sofrito squash, and sweet potato bravas, as well as more substantial fare like the half pollo a la brasa-style chicken and fall-off-the-bone ribs. Birdcage’s atmosphere takes inspiration from South Beach and the 1996 film of the same name, blasting 1980s pop anthems against a technicolor backdrop. Don’t sleep on the red chicken tacos, which are loaded with chicken tinga and come with consumme, birria-style.

A colorful restaurant with blue walls, yellow chairs, blue benches, white tables, and orange lamps.
Birdcage
Liz Attaway

Punk Foodie at Ponce

Copy Link

Avid followers of Atlanta’s thriving pop-up scene are also likely followers of Punk Foodie, a website created by Sam Flemming with a database listing hundreds of pop-up chefs and underground food experiences found around the city and metro area. Now people can find Punk Foodie’s chefs and pop-ups at Ponce City Market in a new stall, where the menu is always rotating and meant to highlight Atlanta’s emerging culinary talents. Think of this food stall as a chef and restaurant incubator space, serving everything from Taiwanese-American comfort foods to takes on Bosnian fare with nods to the South and Atlanta. Chefs and pop-ups are offered short-term residencies at the Punk Foodie stall, which also serves weekend brunch and collaborative dinners on Mondays. It’s best to check the Punk Foodie website for the weekly pop-up lineup and for the calendar of pop-up events happening around town.

Dos Burros

Copy Link

A rolling stone gathers no moss, and that old adage can certainly be attributed to Atlanta restaurateurs Nhan Le and Skip Engelbrecht, who’ve been rapidly expanding upon the success of Fishmonger with new locations over the last year. They’ve now added a new restaurant to their growing collection of establishments: Dos Burros. Partnering with Hopstix brewpub owner Andy Tan, Dos Burros takes over the space previously home to his restaurant Lady Ha at the Ford Factory Lofts on Ponce. Dos Burros is a deeply personal project for Le, named for a concept he and his late business partner chef Angus Brown (8ARM) talked about opening together. Dos Burros is both a restaurant and a margarita bar that also serves its own signature beers brewed locally at Hopstix in Chamblee by Tan. Led in the kitchen by Mexico native chef Domingo Galardo (So Ba, Octopus Bar), expect tacos filled with succulent al pastor, savory brisket, and braised lengua, along with vegetarian options like spicy corn rajas mixed with roasted poblano peppers and crema. Burritos come generously stuffed with protein of choice, as do the loaded nachos. Considering a cocktail? Try the dirty horchata spiked with rum or the house margarita. With its patio flanking the Eastside Trail, garage doors opening onto a breezy mezzanine level, and to-go drinks flowing, Dos Burros is poised to become a popular stop on the Beltline.

Skip Engelbrecht

Indaco, the much-anticipated Charleston Italian restaurant from Indigo Road Hospitality Group (O-Ku,Oak Steakhouse), debuted in October in the Old Fourth Ward, and it’s already become a go-to spot for pasta, pizza, and cocktails on the Eastside Beltline. Located in the same complex as Kroger near Ponce City Market, Indaco is known for its wood-fired pizzas and protein dishes and pastas like bucatini tossed with blue crab or mezzalune stuffed with sweet potato puree. While the Atlanta location features some of the Charleston restaurant’s greatest menu hits, other dishes cater specifically to the ATL crowd, such as the semolina fritters topped with caviar and a tuna and n’duja tostare. Expect an emphasis on Italian wines, along with classic cocktails, including a take on the Aperol spritz in the La Firma and the Beltline Negroni made with reposado tequila, Hoodoo Chicory, sweet vermouth, Campari, cacao, and mole bitters. Reservations encouraged. Bar great for happy hour.

Indaco Atlanta patio naturally lit with tables set for service. Heidi Harris

Bread & Butterfly

Copy Link

Chef Billy Allin stepped away from his Inman Quarter French cafe Bread and Butterfly after eight years. But instead of closing the restaurant, Allin handed the reins over to Brandon Blanchard and chef Demetrius Brown of Caribbean and Afro-American pop-up Heritage Supper Club. Many of the restaurant’s most popular dishes remain on the lunch and brunch menus, but Brown is now adding his own spin on French cuisine at Bread and Butterfly. Brown shines in the kitchen as he explores the foods of the African diaspora heavily influenced by French cuisine due to the colonization by France of African nations and the Caribbean over the centuries. This is especially apparent during dinner in dishes like the sweet and savory Haitian patty, a colorful layered potato salad mixed with Yukon gold potatoes, beets, peppers, and peas, and the pwason fri — a crispy fried snapper drizzled with Creole sauce. Order the banana beignets for dessert, which come with dollops of silky coconut custard and guava and papaya jams. Don’t skip the cocktails or wine here, which lean into French vintages, spirits, and flavors influenced by the Caribbean and West Africa.

Breaker Breaker

Copy Link

Backed by the team behind Grindhouse Killer Burgers, think of Breaker Breaker as a trailside respite, where people pull up on foot or by bike for drinks and a grouper sandwich or fried fish basket before continuing on their way along the Eastside Beltline. Like the beach bars and seafood shacks dotting the Gulf and East coasts, the breezy design maximizes outdoor dining space, while also retaining some original items from the old Stein Steel plant that once resided on the property. Chef Maximilian Hines, formerly of the Lawrence and founder of supper club Stolen Goods, leads the kitchen and carries the coastal theme through on the menu. Look for everything from a blackened grouper sandwich and Gulf fish ceviche to a Cajun shrimp boil and fried vegan calamari. The latter is one of Hines’s signature dishes, which sees hearts of palm shaped like rings of calamari and fried enoki mushrooms meant to resemble tentacles. Expect cocktails like the Lot Lizard spritz with limoncello muddled with basil topped with sparkling wine and soda or a frozen take on the Mexican dessert mangonada called Mucho Nada with mango vodka, mango puree, chamoy, and a tajin rim. Order a banana ice cream sandwich for the road.

Baskets of Gulf fish ceviche, blackened grouper sandwich and fries, fried fish and fries, blackened shrimp salad, and vegan calamari with mushrooms from Breaker Breaker in Atlanta. Ryan Fleisher

Omakase by Yun

Copy Link

After wowing sushi lovers at Chirori Japanese restaurant on 14th Street for over a year, chef Jonathan Yun is back behind the sushi bar at his own restaurant. Now open at Ashford Lane, Yun brings years of experience working with sushi at restaurants throughout Japan and New York City to Dunwoody. With seating for just 10 people at the sushi bar, expect an intimate 16-course omakase experience at one of two seatings per night, featuring masterful dishes by Yun using fish and other ingredients sourced both locally and from the waters of Japan. $185 per person. Reservations required.

Chef Jonathan Yun quick sears six pink pieces of salmon for his omakase experience at Omakase by Yun in Atlanta. Omakase by Yun

The Velvet Hippo

Copy Link

Days after landing a recommendation in Atlanta’s inaugural Michelin guide, the team behind Poor Hendrix announced plans to open a second restaurant by the end of 2023. And, they made good on that promise when The Velvet Hippo opened right before Thanksgiving, serving hot and cold sandwiches, soups, and salads from a 400-foot-space on North Avondale Road. Like Poor Hendrix, owners Aaron and Jamie Russell named the restaurant after one of their dogs, and the food is both creative and fresh. Try the fried Vietnamese catfish sandwich laced with chilis or the pepperoni, provolone, and turkey hoagie. A great vegetarian option sees roasted beets tossed in a paprika vinaigrette served with garlic tahini sauce in a pita. The Velvet Hippo is counter service only, built for quick service and takeout. But you’ll find folks lingering on the covered patio or at tables on the AstroTurf lawn beside the restaurant with a cocktail, glass of wine, or a beer.

Trish Solyn/Google

Owens and Hull at Grand Champion

Backed by pitmasters Robert Owens and Secret Pint BBQ owner Bryan Hull, and located in what was the Smyrna location of Grand Champion BBQ, Owens and Hull merges Texas- and Carolina-style barbecue smoked over Georgia oak on the menu. And the restaurant is already generating serious buzz amongst barbecue enthusiasts in Atlanta. Owens and Hull doesn’t feature a set menu of barbecue standards, but rather a specific menu served each day. This includes a smoked burger topped with White Castle onions and American cheese on Thursdays, reserving sliced brisket and turkey for service on Fridays and Saturdays, and regularly serving the popular sausages from Secret Pint’s pop-ups (Think sausages stuffed cheddar cheese and jalapenos or roasted poblano peppers and Oaxaca cheese.) Only open Thursday through Sunday, expect weekly specials, too, and a rotating selection of side dishes.

Platter of Brunswick stew, sliced brisket and turkey, white bread, and sausage links. Owens and Hull

Bovino After Dark @ Hop City West End

Located inside the bar at Hop City in West End, this underground supper club comes from former Gunshow chef Chris McCord and bartender and butcher Alex Sher. The intimate chefs counter experience seats between 10 and 12 people, offering five courses served omakase style, with optional wine and caviar pairings (You’ll want both.) Sher serves as host and sommelier, which helps give Bovino After Dark a dinner party vibe among the strangers seated at the bar. It also allows McCord to work his magic while diners watch in anticipation of the next course. Think courses of Funyun funnel cake over watermelon granita and Manchester quail stuffed with farro verde garnished with crispy pecans. Dessert offers playful takes on the final course of the meal, including tres leches and persimmon bread pudding topped with trifoliate ice cream drizzled with candy roaster caramel. With limited seating available for dinner on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights, reservations are gobbled up fast. But those who stalk Bovino After Dark’s Instagram feed can often snag last-minute reservations due to cancellations. $65 per person. Wine pairings and caviar optional for an additional charge. Reservations required.

Beth McKibben

Little Sparrow and Bar Blanc

Backed by Ford Fry, the name Little Sparrow refers to French singer Edith Piaf — an affectionate nickname given to the songstress due to her diminutive stature. She was also the lover of French boxer Marcel Cerdan, who is the inspiration behind the name of Fry’s steakhouse at Westside Provisions District. Order the Le Petit Martini to start, described as a “small yet truly exceptional ice-cold” drink made with either gin or vodka. Next, order a bowl of French onion soup with a thick layer of bruleed cheese or some crispy frites drizzled with cheese sauce, part of the restaurant’s raclette service. Move on to steak hache or the poitrine de porc (pork belly) with fennel, apple, and jus. The poulet frites stuffed with black truffles and brioche is prepared table side, as are desserts like the creme caramel, Basque-style cheesecake, and cherries jubilee. Cocktails come with a French bistro twist, too, such as a take on the Manhattan in the Pigalle with bourbon and calvados. Upstairs at Bar Blanc, expect cocktails, a French-leaning wine list, and a prix-fixe menu at $49.50 per person of steak frites, salad, and bread for the table within a date-worthy, intimate space. The bar here also serves the multi-layered digestif Pousse Cafe (“push coffee” in French) — a colorful 19th-century layered shot of liqueurs meant to aid in digestion. Reservations encouraged for Little Sparrow. Bar Blanc walk-ins only.

Poulet frites with crispy fries and a martini from Little Sparrow in Atlanta. Little Sparrow

Pata Negra Mezcaleria

Eagle-eyed Eater readers spotted a trend last year in Atlanta: the rise of upscale Mexican restaurants like Oaxaca centered on regional cuisines opening around the metro area. That trend continues with Pata Negra Mezcaleria restaurant and mezcal bar, which took over the former the Usual space at the Arya apartment complex on Peachtree Street in November 2023. Expect a menu of dishes easily shared, like crispy tlayudas loaded with black beans, Oaxaca cheese, avocado and chapulines and a trio of enmoladas drizzled with smoky mole. Order entrees of tender pulpo served atop squid ink and salsa matcha or a whole branzino dressed with chilis, tomatillos, and peppers. Sip on cocktails leaning into mezcal and other agave spirits, such as the restaurant’s namesake cocktail made with blanco tequila and Banhez Espadín-Barril mezcal, sage, palo santo, and lemon. Open for lunch and dinner. Brunch begins soon.

Pata Negra Mezcaleria

Southern National

The opening of Southern National is a homecoming for owners chef Duane Nutter and Reggie Washington, who worked together for years at One Flew South at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, before departing the city in 2016. They would go on to open Southern National in Mobile, Alabama, (Washington’s hometown) but hinted at a return to Atlanta. The partners officially closed the Mobile location in 2022 to relocate the restaurant to Summerhill. Food leans into Nutter’s travels in the Northwest, Kentucky, and Louisiana, where he was born, as well as the South and Atlanta. The menu features a few of the Mobile location’s most popular dishes, like the mussels and collard greens, along with several new dishes such as herb butter broiled red fish over smoked turkey smothered green beans and field peas and Creole-cured salmon and potato blini. Look for Nutter to bring his signature sense of humor to the menu, too, in desserts like peanut butter panna cotta topped with chunks of Nutter Butter cookies. Nutter and Washington reunited with two longtime friends and former colleagues in Southern National, partnering with Ticonderoga Club owners and critically acclaimed bartenders Greg Best and Paul Calvert, who developed the cocktail program for the restaurant. Reservations encouraged.

Southern National

Brush Sushi

Critically acclaimed restaurant Brush Sushi reopened in the former American Cut space at Buckhead Village in August, after closing last year in Decatur ahead of a planned relocation to a larger space. Unlike in Decatur, which included several izakaya-style dishes, the Buckhead location centers on a la carte sushi and prix fixe sushi options, along with grilled dishes cooked over Binchotan charcoal. The modern, elegant design in Buckhead is set off by large wooden panels featuring intricate carvings of hinoki (a Japanese cypress tree), with a private dining room offering more intimate omakase tastings led by chef and owner Jason Liang. Look for both classic and original cocktails from the bar, an expanded Japanese whisky selection, and a broader focus on sake in Buckhead. Open for lunch and dinner. Reservations encouraged.

Jamestown Properties

Long Snake Wine Bar

After taking over the kitchen at Whoopsie’s on Wednesday nights for three months, the forthcoming wine bar from former 8ARM beverage director Josh Fryer landed a longterm residency in the Georgia Beer Garden space. Named for the PJ Harvey song “Long Snake Moan”, Fryer brings together his love of music, natural wine, and food in dishes like grilled quail with a muscadine-sage gastrique, smashed summer salad dressed with orange blossom vinaigrette, and whole roasted Virginia croaker served with a creamy watercress salad. Look for desserts like lavender chess pie. With good tunes spinning on the turntable, seasonal dishes using fresh, local ingredients, and a solid bottle list boasting funky finds, Long Snake has already become a go-to for Atlanta wine lovers. Thursday - Saturday, 6 p.m. to 12 a.m. Snack menu available in the garden. Dinner menu only available in the dining room and at the bar.

Birdcage

Adjacent to Firepit Pizza Tavern at Larkin on Memorial, “Cutthroat Kitchen” winner Leslie Cohen, and Shaun Whitmer’s Birdcage serves up Latin cuisine at a more-than-decent price point. Devised by Whitmer, the food side is no-nonsense, with an array of items like Michelada shrimp cocktail, sofrito squash, and sweet potato bravas, as well as more substantial fare like the half pollo a la brasa-style chicken and fall-off-the-bone ribs. Birdcage’s atmosphere takes inspiration from South Beach and the 1996 film of the same name, blasting 1980s pop anthems against a technicolor backdrop. Don’t sleep on the red chicken tacos, which are loaded with chicken tinga and come with consumme, birria-style.

A colorful restaurant with blue walls, yellow chairs, blue benches, white tables, and orange lamps.
Birdcage
Liz Attaway

Punk Foodie at Ponce

Avid followers of Atlanta’s thriving pop-up scene are also likely followers of Punk Foodie, a website created by Sam Flemming with a database listing hundreds of pop-up chefs and underground food experiences found around the city and metro area. Now people can find Punk Foodie’s chefs and pop-ups at Ponce City Market in a new stall, where the menu is always rotating and meant to highlight Atlanta’s emerging culinary talents. Think of this food stall as a chef and restaurant incubator space, serving everything from Taiwanese-American comfort foods to takes on Bosnian fare with nods to the South and Atlanta. Chefs and pop-ups are offered short-term residencies at the Punk Foodie stall, which also serves weekend brunch and collaborative dinners on Mondays. It’s best to check the Punk Foodie website for the weekly pop-up lineup and for the calendar of pop-up events happening around town.

Dos Burros

A rolling stone gathers no moss, and that old adage can certainly be attributed to Atlanta restaurateurs Nhan Le and Skip Engelbrecht, who’ve been rapidly expanding upon the success of Fishmonger with new locations over the last year. They’ve now added a new restaurant to their growing collection of establishments: Dos Burros. Partnering with Hopstix brewpub owner Andy Tan, Dos Burros takes over the space previously home to his restaurant Lady Ha at the Ford Factory Lofts on Ponce. Dos Burros is a deeply personal project for Le, named for a concept he and his late business partner chef Angus Brown (8ARM) talked about opening together. Dos Burros is both a restaurant and a margarita bar that also serves its own signature beers brewed locally at Hopstix in Chamblee by Tan. Led in the kitchen by Mexico native chef Domingo Galardo (So Ba, Octopus Bar), expect tacos filled with succulent al pastor, savory brisket, and braised lengua, along with vegetarian options like spicy corn rajas mixed with roasted poblano peppers and crema. Burritos come generously stuffed with protein of choice, as do the loaded nachos. Considering a cocktail? Try the dirty horchata spiked with rum or the house margarita. With its patio flanking the Eastside Trail, garage doors opening onto a breezy mezzanine level, and to-go drinks flowing, Dos Burros is poised to become a popular stop on the Beltline.

Skip Engelbrecht

Indaco

Indaco, the much-anticipated Charleston Italian restaurant from Indigo Road Hospitality Group (O-Ku,Oak Steakhouse), debuted in October in the Old Fourth Ward, and it’s already become a go-to spot for pasta, pizza, and cocktails on the Eastside Beltline. Located in the same complex as Kroger near Ponce City Market, Indaco is known for its wood-fired pizzas and protein dishes and pastas like bucatini tossed with blue crab or mezzalune stuffed with sweet potato puree. While the Atlanta location features some of the Charleston restaurant’s greatest menu hits, other dishes cater specifically to the ATL crowd, such as the semolina fritters topped with caviar and a tuna and n’duja tostare. Expect an emphasis on Italian wines, along with classic cocktails, including a take on the Aperol spritz in the La Firma and the Beltline Negroni made with reposado tequila, Hoodoo Chicory, sweet vermouth, Campari, cacao, and mole bitters. Reservations encouraged. Bar great for happy hour.

Indaco Atlanta patio naturally lit with tables set for service. Heidi Harris

Bread & Butterfly

Chef Billy Allin stepped away from his Inman Quarter French cafe Bread and Butterfly after eight years. But instead of closing the restaurant, Allin handed the reins over to Brandon Blanchard and chef Demetrius Brown of Caribbean and Afro-American pop-up Heritage Supper Club. Many of the restaurant’s most popular dishes remain on the lunch and brunch menus, but Brown is now adding his own spin on French cuisine at Bread and Butterfly. Brown shines in the kitchen as he explores the foods of the African diaspora heavily influenced by French cuisine due to the colonization by France of African nations and the Caribbean over the centuries. This is especially apparent during dinner in dishes like the sweet and savory Haitian patty, a colorful layered potato salad mixed with Yukon gold potatoes, beets, peppers, and peas, and the pwason fri — a crispy fried snapper drizzled with Creole sauce. Order the banana beignets for dessert, which come with dollops of silky coconut custard and guava and papaya jams. Don’t skip the cocktails or wine here, which lean into French vintages, spirits, and flavors influenced by the Caribbean and West Africa.

Breaker Breaker

Backed by the team behind Grindhouse Killer Burgers, think of Breaker Breaker as a trailside respite, where people pull up on foot or by bike for drinks and a grouper sandwich or fried fish basket before continuing on their way along the Eastside Beltline. Like the beach bars and seafood shacks dotting the Gulf and East coasts, the breezy design maximizes outdoor dining space, while also retaining some original items from the old Stein Steel plant that once resided on the property. Chef Maximilian Hines, formerly of the Lawrence and founder of supper club Stolen Goods, leads the kitchen and carries the coastal theme through on the menu. Look for everything from a blackened grouper sandwich and Gulf fish ceviche to a Cajun shrimp boil and fried vegan calamari. The latter is one of Hines’s signature dishes, which sees hearts of palm shaped like rings of calamari and fried enoki mushrooms meant to resemble tentacles. Expect cocktails like the Lot Lizard spritz with limoncello muddled with basil topped with sparkling wine and soda or a frozen take on the Mexican dessert mangonada called Mucho Nada with mango vodka, mango puree, chamoy, and a tajin rim. Order a banana ice cream sandwich for the road.

Baskets of Gulf fish ceviche, blackened grouper sandwich and fries, fried fish and fries, blackened shrimp salad, and vegan calamari with mushrooms from Breaker Breaker in Atlanta. Ryan Fleisher

Omakase by Yun

After wowing sushi lovers at Chirori Japanese restaurant on 14th Street for over a year, chef Jonathan Yun is back behind the sushi bar at his own restaurant. Now open at Ashford Lane, Yun brings years of experience working with sushi at restaurants throughout Japan and New York City to Dunwoody. With seating for just 10 people at the sushi bar, expect an intimate 16-course omakase experience at one of two seatings per night, featuring masterful dishes by Yun using fish and other ingredients sourced both locally and from the waters of Japan. $185 per person. Reservations required.

Chef Jonathan Yun quick sears six pink pieces of salmon for his omakase experience at Omakase by Yun in Atlanta. Omakase by Yun

The Velvet Hippo

Days after landing a recommendation in Atlanta’s inaugural Michelin guide, the team behind Poor Hendrix announced plans to open a second restaurant by the end of 2023. And, they made good on that promise when The Velvet Hippo opened right before Thanksgiving, serving hot and cold sandwiches, soups, and salads from a 400-foot-space on North Avondale Road. Like Poor Hendrix, owners Aaron and Jamie Russell named the restaurant after one of their dogs, and the food is both creative and fresh. Try the fried Vietnamese catfish sandwich laced with chilis or the pepperoni, provolone, and turkey hoagie. A great vegetarian option sees roasted beets tossed in a paprika vinaigrette served with garlic tahini sauce in a pita. The Velvet Hippo is counter service only, built for quick service and takeout. But you’ll find folks lingering on the covered patio or at tables on the AstroTurf lawn beside the restaurant with a cocktail, glass of wine, or a beer.

Trish Solyn/Google

Related Maps