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a potato croquette topped with trout roe, grated eggs, and crème fraiche from Humble Pie in Atlanta.
Potato croquette topped with trout roe, grated eggs, and crème fraiche at Humble Pie.
Matt Wong

The 15 Hottest New Restaurants Around Atlanta Right Now

From flavor-packed vegan riffs on Cuban and Mexican classics and a lively oyster bar to tender roast beef sandwiches paired with amaretto sours and clam pizzas on Howell Mill

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Potato croquette topped with trout roe, grated eggs, and crème fraiche at Humble Pie.
| Matt Wong

New restaurants debut on the dining scene every month, both inside and outside the perimeter, but some establishments hit the ground running right out of the gate and stand out above the rest. These are the new restaurants generating serious buzz at the moment among avid Atlanta diners. While the Eater 38 highlights Atlanta restaurant institutions, old standbys, and neighborhood essentials, this map spotlights the new places people are flocking to right now. Here are the new restaurants and pop-ups to check out this month around Atlanta.

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Serenidad

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Deborah VanTrece (Twisted Soul Cookhouse and Pours) opened her second restaurant in Cascade Heights, a Latin soul food spot called Serenidad. Located just steps from Oreatha’s, which centers on soulful homestyle dishes from around the globe, Serenidad channels the soulful cooking roots of the Caribbean and Latin America, including dishes styled after those found in countries like Mexico, Peru, Venezuela, and Brazil. Led in the kitchen by chef Whitney Thomas, expect dishes such as paella grits with mussels and head-on shrimp, duck fat tamales, and canoas de plantanos paired with cocktails made with tequila, mezcal, cachaça, and pisco.

Gambas al ajillo from Serenidad in Atlanta. Josh Swinney

Omakase Table

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Omakase Table began life as a pop-up at Silom Thai and Sushi prior to the pandemic, eventually moving to Brush Sushi Izakaya (now Cuddlefish), where founder chef Leonard Yu offered a six-seat omakase of up to 20 courses. Now open as a restaurant at Seven88 complex, Yu brings his intimate pop-up to life on a grander scale, offering two seatings per night for up to 12 people. An omakase here includes course after course of otsumami (small bites), fresh nigiri, dishes like atsuyaki tamago castella (multi-layered omelette), temaki (hand roll), and dessert. Jeff Banks joins Omakase Table as bar manager. He previously worked behind the bars at Brush Sushi, C. Ellet’s Steakhouse, and Southbound. At Brush, Banks was known for crafting refined cocktails using sake, Japanese whisky, and soju. Expect similar cocktails and non-alcoholic drinks at Omakase Table, along with wine and sake meant for pairing. Look for a takeout option to launch soon. Reservations required.

Omakase Table

Humble Pie

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Backed by Lazy Betty chefs Ron Hsu and Aaron Phillips, Humble Pie joins a collection of new restaurants now open at the Interlock on Howell Mill Road. An open and airy restaurant filled with natural light and multiple seating areas, including an upstairs mezzanine and patios with indoor/outdoor bars, expect wood-fired pizzas like a classic margherita, a clam pie, or broccoli and cheddar on wheat and sourdough crusts made using grains from Athens-based farm DaySpring Farms. Pizzas also come with the option to add caviar and black truffles. Beyond pizza, look for other dishes, too, like a French onion hand pie, a potato croquette topped with trout roe, grated eggs, and crème fraiche, and shrimp casarecce pasta from chef Evelyn Ling (Pancake Social, Bacchanalia.) Open for lunch and dinner. A weekday happy hour and late-night food begin soon. Reservations encouraged.

The Greek pizza from Humble Pie in Atlanta. Matt Wong

Roshambo "The Diner's Diner"

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The team behind Muss and Turner’s, MTH Pizza, and Local Three just opened another Atlanta restaurant together, this time an Atlanta version of a “21st-century diner” called Roshambo. Another name for the game “rock, paper, scissors,” Roshambo replaces those trio of choices with a hodgepodge of breakfast, lunch, and dinner foods served throughout the day, including buckwheat pancakes, shrimp and grits, a fried bologna sandwich, spaghetti cacio e pepe, and daily specials. Chef Kevin Leveille pays homage to the late Jim White and his longtime Peachtree Battle restaurant Jim White’s Half Shell, offering oysters Rockefeller and blackened redfish Pontchartrain with cheddar grit cakes. In addition to wine and beer, order classic cocktails like the Aviation, Manhattan, and Hemingway daiquiri and pitchers of martinis served wet, dirty, or dry.

Layla Ritchey

Alici Oyster Bar

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With a design and menu influenced by the Amalfi Coast, Alici brings to Midtown Promenade a lively Italian seafood restaurant and oyster bar built for lingering with friends. Backed by Pat Pascarella (the White Bull, Bastone, Grana), Alici takes over the former Frogs Cantina space at the complex, serving a selection of fresh oysters, crudos (try the red snapper dentice rosso with apple, chili, mint, and walnut crumble,) and appetizers like tender polpo (octopus) served with caper-tarragon aioli, red onions, and burnt olives. Whole fish entrees come with a choice of sauces, and Pascarella’s pastas are on full display here, including a campannelle neri tossed with rock shrimp, tomatoes, and garlic crumbs. Order sparkling wines and light-bodied reds, along with cocktails, such as the Fumo, Fumo with smokey mezcal and elote liquor, from the bar. Reservations encouraged.

Bomb Biscuit Atlanta

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Celebrated baker Erika Council relocated her popular biscuit stall to the former Field Day space on Highland this past fall. Now open as a full-fledged restaurant, Bomb Biscuit Co. continues to offer Council’s fluffy buttermilk biscuit sandwiches, including her signature Glori-Fried chicken biscuit and breakfast standards like the BEC topped with American cheese. Not into biscuits? Order one of the scrumptious cinnamon rolls or trio of B’Onuts (deep-fried biscuit dough balls coated in cinnamon sugar). Council eventually plans to expand the menu, offering catfish and grits and pancakes made from biscuit dough. She’s also considering launching Sunday brunch in the future, with dishes styled after those found on menus at restaurants frequented by parishioners after church. Order takeout at the counter or asked to be seated in the sunny dining room beyond the kitchen or on the back patio.

Fried chicken biscuit topped with egg and cheese from Bomb Biscuit in Atlanta Andrew Thomas Lee

Yalda Persian & Middle Eastern Restaurant

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Persian restaurant Yalda opened recently in Sandy Springs at Aria Village. People are already charmed by the food and the warm and welcoming vibe of the restaurant, calling Yalda a great addition to the Sandy Springs dining scene. Named for the Iranian winter solstice festival celebrated on the “longest and darkest night of the year,” Yalda serves a variety of Persian and Mediterranean mezze plates, spreads like za’atar labneh and mirza ghasemi served with flatbread, kebabs, wraps, and grilled meat and seafood entrees. Dessert includes baklava with a choice of coffee or Persian ice cream, faloodeh, and a Persian ice cream sandwich made with ice cream infused with saffron, rose water, and pistachios.

Persian restaurant Yalda is opening locations in Sandy Springs and Howell Mill Road in Atlanta. Yalda

La Semilla

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La Semilla flexes the flavors of Cuban and Mexican dishes on a menu rooted in veganism and family recipes. And for owners Sophia Marchese and Reid Trapani, La Semilla (or the seed) is just the beginning of a new chapter in their restaurant careers. Forged from a pop-up launched just before the pandemic, La Semilla is a flavor-packed triumph of vegan dishes, like meatless versions of vegan chicken tamals steamed in banana leaves served with a punchy ancho sauce, croquetas de jamon stuffed with seitan ham Tranpani makes himself, and bistec de palomilla made with Lion’s Mane mushrooms. Start off with sikil pak (spicy pumpkin seed and tomato dip) served with fresh tortilla chips. And don’t skip the chochoyotes (masa dumplings filled with corn puree) served atop a thin layer of coconut-corn broth topped with a poblano-corn sofrito and matcha oil and fried tortillas for scooping. A zero food waste policy means unused ingredients are incorporated back into sauces and salsas for dishes at La Semilla or made into tinctures or syrups for riffs on classic cocktails. Reservations highly encouraged.

Bistec de palomilla made with Lion’s Mane mushrooms. Ashley Wilson

Whoopsie's

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This unpretentious cocktail lounge from barman Tim Faulkner (Octopus Bar) and chef Hudson Rouse is worth the trip to Reynoldstown alone for its tight list of exceptional cocktails and fun and funky wines. And for folks who’ve eaten at Rouse’s Avondale Estates restaurant Rising Son, it should come as no surprise that the food served at Whoopsie’s punches far above its weight for a cocktail bar. This includes a delectable roast beef sandwich with horsey sauce and a refreshing satsuma salad dressed with champagne vinaigrette. Make sure to start off with a snack tray of deviled eggs, house-made chow chow and pimento cheese, and toasted sourdough points. Daily dinner specials at Whoopsie’s include porchetta on Thursdays, poached sea bass on Sundays, and perfectly cooked prime rib on Saturday nights. The daily dessert might feature mint ice cream with crushed Oreo’s, fashioned after the classic grasshopper cocktail, or the Tarzan’s Delight, based on Rouse’s grandmother’s take on a chocolate mousse ice box pie. Low lit and at just 40 seats, Whoopsie’s is intimate and unfussy, and built for an evening of convivial conversation while indulging in amaretto sours and top-notch food you can’t seem to stop eating. Open Thursday through Monday, 5 p.m. to 12 a.m.

Three thick slice of tender roast beef topped with horseradish sauce sandwiched between a slice roasted onion brioche bun from Whoopsie’s cocktail lounge in Atlanta. Matt Wong

So So Fed Laotian pop-up @ OK YAKI

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Laotian pop-up So So Fed (2022 Eater award winner for best new pop-up) is now in residency on Sunday and Monday evenings at OK Yaki in East Atlanta. With a name inspired by the storied Atlanta record label, this pop-up is a culinary love letter dedicated to family recipes and foods often cooked by Molli Voraotsady’s late grandmother. Comforting bowls of red pork curry served with sticky rice are laden with vegetables like Thai eggplant, zucchini, and bamboo shoots beside tender chunks of pork shoulder swimming in aromatic chili broth. Subtle spice radiates from the crispy skin of the Hat Yai fried chicken, enhanced by sides of fragrant jasmine rice. Heat from chilis in the Lao papaya salad are balanced by warm fermented flavors that build with each bite. Look for cocktails created by former 8ARM general manager and bartender Joshua Fryer during the pop-up, too. Follow on Instagram for updates.

TKO Korean food stall @ Southern Feed Store

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Chef Lino Yi opened his pop-up as a Korean-American street food stall at the end of 2022 inside Southern Feedstore in East Atlanta Village. And Yi hasn’t skipped a beat at TKO (the Korean One), offering a menu of dishes melding Korean and American street foods together in cheesy Korean corn dogs, kimchi fried rice, Korean fried chicken nuggets, Korean beef egg roll taquitos, and hot and spicy tteokbokki (rice cakes). While the food here is worth a visit any time of day, late-night diners in EAV are especially happy to have an affordable spot to eat into the wee hours on the weekends that doesn’t skimp on portions or on flavor. TKO joins Brazilian restaurant and coffee bar ButecoWoody’s CheeseSteaksGyro Gyro, and Waffle Bar at the mini food hall. Open until 3 a.m. on Friday and Saturday.

A person pulls the gooey cheese from a Korean corn dog at TKO inside Southern Feed Store in East Atlanta. Colette Collins

Gigi's Italian Kitchen & Restaurant

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Chefs Eric Brooks and Jacob Armando transformed their weekly pop-up in Candler Park into a permanent restaurant in August 2022, transforming the former Gato space into a cozy Italian bistro with tables draped in red checkered linens set off by candlelight and flowers. It’s now an award-winning restaurant serving a menu of traditional red sauce classics made with in-season produce and fresh-made pastas, expect dishes like rigatoni fazool with cowpeas replacing cannellini beans and chicken marsala served with fresh focaccia. Dessert features Gigi’s popular tiramisu. A tight list of cocktails, wine, beer, and amaro round out the beverage list, which includes the Dirty Gigi martini and a rye Old Fashioned punched up with espresso and coffee bitters.

Rigatoni fazool with cowpeas from Gigi’s Italian Kitchen in Atlanta Beth McKibben

Tortuga y Chango

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What began as a series of mezcal dinners at El Tesoro transformed into a mezcal bar and restaurant from Alan Raines and Samantha Eaves. Taking over the former Lawrence’s Cafe space, Tortuga y Chango builds a bridge between chef Hugo Suastegui’s hometown of Acapulco and the Pacific coast of Guerrero, Mexico, in the food and drinks. Expect dishes like vieiras a la sarten (scallops atop corn puree, jalapenos, seasoned vegetables and fruit); pescado entero (whole grilled fish in an adobo marinade); and aguachile de camaron (tostada topped with citrus-marinated shrimp) on the menu here. Cocktails by beverage director Orestes Cruz feature small producer mezcals and tequila in drinks like the El Corazon made with mezcal, fino sherry, and cynar.

Vieiras a la Sarten: scallops atop corn puree, jalapenos, seasoned vegetables and fruit from Tortuga y Chango in Decatur, GA. Ryan Fleisher

Foundation Social Eatery

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When chef Mel Toledo announced the closure of his beloved Roswell restaurant in 2020, regulars mourned the loss of the good food, cocktails, and vibe they always experienced there. But he promised to bring the restaurant back bigger and better than ever. And it appears he’s done just that in Alpharetta. Now open in the North Fulton city’s burgeoning downtown dining district, Foundation Social Eatery offers a sense of familiarity for regulars to the Roswell restaurant, but with a fresh take on both the food and decor. Expect to find a few of the restaurant’s most popular dishes, including the crispy Spanish octopus, pate, PEI mussels, and chicken bolognese, along with new dishes like salt and sugar cured scallop crudo served with warm brown butter vinaigrette, turnip and ricotta tortelli filled with duck confit and pickled mushrooms, and a confit lamb neck for two. Look for drinks like the Ghosted made with bourbon, lemon and a float of cabernet sauvignon (a spin on a whiskey sour using a technique to create clarified milk punches.) The London dry gin-based Little R&R is a play on the Clover Club, featuring raspberry syrup mixed with rosemary, dry vermouth, and lemon loomy (dried limes). Parisian-style market and daytime cafe Petite FSE opens inside the restaurant soon. Reservations highly encouraged.

A classic dish of French escargot swimming in garlic herb butter served with a demi baguette from Foundation Social Eatery in Alpharetta, GA. Heidi Harris

The Bite of Korea

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Korean street food restaurant the Bite of Korea (BOK), owned by Gavin Lee and Chloe Jung, recently opened at the Hugh Howell Marketplace in Tucker. Like the pop-up, BOK serves a similar menu that includes its popular bulgogi quesadillas, soy garlic Korean fried chicken, doenjang-jjigae stew, so-dduk skewers, and japchae noodles. Look for a lunch box special (or dosirak), Tuesday through Friday, featuring a choice of meat (bulgogi, jeyuk pork, or Korean fried chicken), fried or white rice, soup and salad, batter-fried vegetables, and mandu (dumplings).

Bulgogi Quesadilla from Atlanta pop-up soon to be restaurant the Bite of Korea. The Bite of Korea

Serenidad

Deborah VanTrece (Twisted Soul Cookhouse and Pours) opened her second restaurant in Cascade Heights, a Latin soul food spot called Serenidad. Located just steps from Oreatha’s, which centers on soulful homestyle dishes from around the globe, Serenidad channels the soulful cooking roots of the Caribbean and Latin America, including dishes styled after those found in countries like Mexico, Peru, Venezuela, and Brazil. Led in the kitchen by chef Whitney Thomas, expect dishes such as paella grits with mussels and head-on shrimp, duck fat tamales, and canoas de plantanos paired with cocktails made with tequila, mezcal, cachaça, and pisco.

Gambas al ajillo from Serenidad in Atlanta. Josh Swinney

Omakase Table

Omakase Table began life as a pop-up at Silom Thai and Sushi prior to the pandemic, eventually moving to Brush Sushi Izakaya (now Cuddlefish), where founder chef Leonard Yu offered a six-seat omakase of up to 20 courses. Now open as a restaurant at Seven88 complex, Yu brings his intimate pop-up to life on a grander scale, offering two seatings per night for up to 12 people. An omakase here includes course after course of otsumami (small bites), fresh nigiri, dishes like atsuyaki tamago castella (multi-layered omelette), temaki (hand roll), and dessert. Jeff Banks joins Omakase Table as bar manager. He previously worked behind the bars at Brush Sushi, C. Ellet’s Steakhouse, and Southbound. At Brush, Banks was known for crafting refined cocktails using sake, Japanese whisky, and soju. Expect similar cocktails and non-alcoholic drinks at Omakase Table, along with wine and sake meant for pairing. Look for a takeout option to launch soon. Reservations required.

Omakase Table

Humble Pie

Backed by Lazy Betty chefs Ron Hsu and Aaron Phillips, Humble Pie joins a collection of new restaurants now open at the Interlock on Howell Mill Road. An open and airy restaurant filled with natural light and multiple seating areas, including an upstairs mezzanine and patios with indoor/outdoor bars, expect wood-fired pizzas like a classic margherita, a clam pie, or broccoli and cheddar on wheat and sourdough crusts made using grains from Athens-based farm DaySpring Farms. Pizzas also come with the option to add caviar and black truffles. Beyond pizza, look for other dishes, too, like a French onion hand pie, a potato croquette topped with trout roe, grated eggs, and crème fraiche, and shrimp casarecce pasta from chef Evelyn Ling (Pancake Social, Bacchanalia.) Open for lunch and dinner. A weekday happy hour and late-night food begin soon. Reservations encouraged.

The Greek pizza from Humble Pie in Atlanta. Matt Wong

Roshambo "The Diner's Diner"

The team behind Muss and Turner’s, MTH Pizza, and Local Three just opened another Atlanta restaurant together, this time an Atlanta version of a “21st-century diner” called Roshambo. Another name for the game “rock, paper, scissors,” Roshambo replaces those trio of choices with a hodgepodge of breakfast, lunch, and dinner foods served throughout the day, including buckwheat pancakes, shrimp and grits, a fried bologna sandwich, spaghetti cacio e pepe, and daily specials. Chef Kevin Leveille pays homage to the late Jim White and his longtime Peachtree Battle restaurant Jim White’s Half Shell, offering oysters Rockefeller and blackened redfish Pontchartrain with cheddar grit cakes. In addition to wine and beer, order classic cocktails like the Aviation, Manhattan, and Hemingway daiquiri and pitchers of martinis served wet, dirty, or dry.

Layla Ritchey

Alici Oyster Bar

With a design and menu influenced by the Amalfi Coast, Alici brings to Midtown Promenade a lively Italian seafood restaurant and oyster bar built for lingering with friends. Backed by Pat Pascarella (the White Bull, Bastone, Grana), Alici takes over the former Frogs Cantina space at the complex, serving a selection of fresh oysters, crudos (try the red snapper dentice rosso with apple, chili, mint, and walnut crumble,) and appetizers like tender polpo (octopus) served with caper-tarragon aioli, red onions, and burnt olives. Whole fish entrees come with a choice of sauces, and Pascarella’s pastas are on full display here, including a campannelle neri tossed with rock shrimp, tomatoes, and garlic crumbs. Order sparkling wines and light-bodied reds, along with cocktails, such as the Fumo, Fumo with smokey mezcal and elote liquor, from the bar. Reservations encouraged.

Bomb Biscuit Atlanta

Celebrated baker Erika Council relocated her popular biscuit stall to the former Field Day space on Highland this past fall. Now open as a full-fledged restaurant, Bomb Biscuit Co. continues to offer Council’s fluffy buttermilk biscuit sandwiches, including her signature Glori-Fried chicken biscuit and breakfast standards like the BEC topped with American cheese. Not into biscuits? Order one of the scrumptious cinnamon rolls or trio of B’Onuts (deep-fried biscuit dough balls coated in cinnamon sugar). Council eventually plans to expand the menu, offering catfish and grits and pancakes made from biscuit dough. She’s also considering launching Sunday brunch in the future, with dishes styled after those found on menus at restaurants frequented by parishioners after church. Order takeout at the counter or asked to be seated in the sunny dining room beyond the kitchen or on the back patio.

Fried chicken biscuit topped with egg and cheese from Bomb Biscuit in Atlanta Andrew Thomas Lee

Yalda Persian & Middle Eastern Restaurant

Persian restaurant Yalda opened recently in Sandy Springs at Aria Village. People are already charmed by the food and the warm and welcoming vibe of the restaurant, calling Yalda a great addition to the Sandy Springs dining scene. Named for the Iranian winter solstice festival celebrated on the “longest and darkest night of the year,” Yalda serves a variety of Persian and Mediterranean mezze plates, spreads like za’atar labneh and mirza ghasemi served with flatbread, kebabs, wraps, and grilled meat and seafood entrees. Dessert includes baklava with a choice of coffee or Persian ice cream, faloodeh, and a Persian ice cream sandwich made with ice cream infused with saffron, rose water, and pistachios.

Persian restaurant Yalda is opening locations in Sandy Springs and Howell Mill Road in Atlanta. Yalda

La Semilla

La Semilla flexes the flavors of Cuban and Mexican dishes on a menu rooted in veganism and family recipes. And for owners Sophia Marchese and Reid Trapani, La Semilla (or the seed) is just the beginning of a new chapter in their restaurant careers. Forged from a pop-up launched just before the pandemic, La Semilla is a flavor-packed triumph of vegan dishes, like meatless versions of vegan chicken tamals steamed in banana leaves served with a punchy ancho sauce, croquetas de jamon stuffed with seitan ham Tranpani makes himself, and bistec de palomilla made with Lion’s Mane mushrooms. Start off with sikil pak (spicy pumpkin seed and tomato dip) served with fresh tortilla chips. And don’t skip the chochoyotes (masa dumplings filled with corn puree) served atop a thin layer of coconut-corn broth topped with a poblano-corn sofrito and matcha oil and fried tortillas for scooping. A zero food waste policy means unused ingredients are incorporated back into sauces and salsas for dishes at La Semilla or made into tinctures or syrups for riffs on classic cocktails. Reservations highly encouraged.

Bistec de palomilla made with Lion’s Mane mushrooms. Ashley Wilson

Whoopsie's

This unpretentious cocktail lounge from barman Tim Faulkner (Octopus Bar) and chef Hudson Rouse is worth the trip to Reynoldstown alone for its tight list of exceptional cocktails and fun and funky wines. And for folks who’ve eaten at Rouse’s Avondale Estates restaurant Rising Son, it should come as no surprise that the food served at Whoopsie’s punches far above its weight for a cocktail bar. This includes a delectable roast beef sandwich with horsey sauce and a refreshing satsuma salad dressed with champagne vinaigrette. Make sure to start off with a snack tray of deviled eggs, house-made chow chow and pimento cheese, and toasted sourdough points. Daily dinner specials at Whoopsie’s include porchetta on Thursdays, poached sea bass on Sundays, and perfectly cooked prime rib on Saturday nights. The daily dessert might feature mint ice cream with crushed Oreo’s, fashioned after the classic grasshopper cocktail, or the Tarzan’s Delight, based on Rouse’s grandmother’s take on a chocolate mousse ice box pie. Low lit and at just 40 seats, Whoopsie’s is intimate and unfussy, and built for an evening of convivial conversation while indulging in amaretto sours and top-notch food you can’t seem to stop eating. Open Thursday through Monday, 5 p.m. to 12 a.m.

Three thick slice of tender roast beef topped with horseradish sauce sandwiched between a slice roasted onion brioche bun from Whoopsie’s cocktail lounge in Atlanta. Matt Wong

So So Fed Laotian pop-up @ OK YAKI

Laotian pop-up So So Fed (2022 Eater award winner for best new pop-up) is now in residency on Sunday and Monday evenings at OK Yaki in East Atlanta. With a name inspired by the storied Atlanta record label, this pop-up is a culinary love letter dedicated to family recipes and foods often cooked by Molli Voraotsady’s late grandmother. Comforting bowls of red pork curry served with sticky rice are laden with vegetables like Thai eggplant, zucchini, and bamboo shoots beside tender chunks of pork shoulder swimming in aromatic chili broth. Subtle spice radiates from the crispy skin of the Hat Yai fried chicken, enhanced by sides of fragrant jasmine rice. Heat from chilis in the Lao papaya salad are balanced by warm fermented flavors that build with each bite. Look for cocktails created by former 8ARM general manager and bartender Joshua Fryer during the pop-up, too. Follow on Instagram for updates.

TKO Korean food stall @ Southern Feed Store

Chef Lino Yi opened his pop-up as a Korean-American street food stall at the end of 2022 inside Southern Feedstore in East Atlanta Village. And Yi hasn’t skipped a beat at TKO (the Korean One), offering a menu of dishes melding Korean and American street foods together in cheesy Korean corn dogs, kimchi fried rice, Korean fried chicken nuggets, Korean beef egg roll taquitos, and hot and spicy tteokbokki (rice cakes). While the food here is worth a visit any time of day, late-night diners in EAV are especially happy to have an affordable spot to eat into the wee hours on the weekends that doesn’t skimp on portions or on flavor. TKO joins Brazilian restaurant and coffee bar ButecoWoody’s CheeseSteaksGyro Gyro, and Waffle Bar at the mini food hall. Open until 3 a.m. on Friday and Saturday.

A person pulls the gooey cheese from a Korean corn dog at TKO inside Southern Feed Store in East Atlanta. Colette Collins

Gigi's Italian Kitchen & Restaurant

Chefs Eric Brooks and Jacob Armando transformed their weekly pop-up in Candler Park into a permanent restaurant in August 2022, transforming the former Gato space into a cozy Italian bistro with tables draped in red checkered linens set off by candlelight and flowers. It’s now an award-winning restaurant serving a menu of traditional red sauce classics made with in-season produce and fresh-made pastas, expect dishes like rigatoni fazool with cowpeas replacing cannellini beans and chicken marsala served with fresh focaccia. Dessert features Gigi’s popular tiramisu. A tight list of cocktails, wine, beer, and amaro round out the beverage list, which includes the Dirty Gigi martini and a rye Old Fashioned punched up with espresso and coffee bitters.

Rigatoni fazool with cowpeas from Gigi’s Italian Kitchen in Atlanta Beth McKibben

Tortuga y Chango

What began as a series of mezcal dinners at El Tesoro transformed into a mezcal bar and restaurant from Alan Raines and Samantha Eaves. Taking over the former Lawrence’s Cafe space, Tortuga y Chango builds a bridge between chef Hugo Suastegui’s hometown of Acapulco and the Pacific coast of Guerrero, Mexico, in the food and drinks. Expect dishes like vieiras a la sarten (scallops atop corn puree, jalapenos, seasoned vegetables and fruit); pescado entero (whole grilled fish in an adobo marinade); and aguachile de camaron (tostada topped with citrus-marinated shrimp) on the menu here. Cocktails by beverage director Orestes Cruz feature small producer mezcals and tequila in drinks like the El Corazon made with mezcal, fino sherry, and cynar.

Vieiras a la Sarten: scallops atop corn puree, jalapenos, seasoned vegetables and fruit from Tortuga y Chango in Decatur, GA. Ryan Fleisher

Foundation Social Eatery

When chef Mel Toledo announced the closure of his beloved Roswell restaurant in 2020, regulars mourned the loss of the good food, cocktails, and vibe they always experienced there. But he promised to bring the restaurant back bigger and better than ever. And it appears he’s done just that in Alpharetta. Now open in the North Fulton city’s burgeoning downtown dining district, Foundation Social Eatery offers a sense of familiarity for regulars to the Roswell restaurant, but with a fresh take on both the food and decor. Expect to find a few of the restaurant’s most popular dishes, including the crispy Spanish octopus, pate, PEI mussels, and chicken bolognese, along with new dishes like salt and sugar cured scallop crudo served with warm brown butter vinaigrette, turnip and ricotta tortelli filled with duck confit and pickled mushrooms, and a confit lamb neck for two. Look for drinks like the Ghosted made with bourbon, lemon and a float of cabernet sauvignon (a spin on a whiskey sour using a technique to create clarified milk punches.) The London dry gin-based Little R&R is a play on the Clover Club, featuring raspberry syrup mixed with rosemary, dry vermouth, and lemon loomy (dried limes). Parisian-style market and daytime cafe Petite FSE opens inside the restaurant soon. Reservations highly encouraged.

A classic dish of French escargot swimming in garlic herb butter served with a demi baguette from Foundation Social Eatery in Alpharetta, GA. Heidi Harris

The Bite of Korea

Korean street food restaurant the Bite of Korea (BOK), owned by Gavin Lee and Chloe Jung, recently opened at the Hugh Howell Marketplace in Tucker. Like the pop-up, BOK serves a similar menu that includes its popular bulgogi quesadillas, soy garlic Korean fried chicken, doenjang-jjigae stew, so-dduk skewers, and japchae noodles. Look for a lunch box special (or dosirak), Tuesday through Friday, featuring a choice of meat (bulgogi, jeyuk pork, or Korean fried chicken), fried or white rice, soup and salad, batter-fried vegetables, and mandu (dumplings).

Bulgogi Quesadilla from Atlanta pop-up soon to be restaurant the Bite of Korea. The Bite of Korea

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