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Dish Korean

The Korean Restaurants to Try Around Atlanta

From Korean fried chicken and squid bokkeum to spicy tofu stew and bibimbap

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Atlanta is home to a thriving Korean community which includes dozens of restaurants throughout the metro area offering everything from traditional dishes to those served with a Southern touch. Thanks to a lot of research and help from a few trusted friends and readers, Eater Atlanta compiled this list of Korean restaurants to try with suggestions on what to order at each.

Don’t see a favorite Korean restaurant on this list? Send a quick email with details via the tipline. Here’s where to head for Korean barbecue.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Thank U Chicken

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Head up to Duluth for Korean fried chicken at Thank U Chicken. It’s totally worth the trek north. While Thank U offers traditional batter-fried chicken on its menu, the standout stars include the soy sauce marinated and the spicy sauce fried birds. An entire chicken here averages around $25. Beer and wine are also available.

Seo Ra Beol

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When that Korean barbecue craving hits at 3 a.m., head to Seo Ra Beol in Duluth. The restaurant serves traditional Korean barbecue using charcoal grills. Try the pork belly, beef brisket, and short ribs. Family-style barbecue meals are also available. Seo Ra Beol offers classic dishes beyond its barbecue menu, like bibimbap, hearty and spicy stews, and a seafood pancake.

9292 Korean BBQ

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The restaurant uses traditional charcoal table grills rather than electric. The unmistakeable, smokey flavor the grill produces in the meats, along with the quality of the meat used make all the difference. Order the Special #2 with seasoned pork, pork belly, beef short ribs, rib eye, beef bulgogi, and brisket. It comes with banchan (Korean side dishes, including kimchi fried rice).

JS KITCHEN by Jang Su Jang

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Looking for really good, super fresh Korean takeout? Catering business and cooking school JS Kitchen, owned by the Shelly Lee of Korean restaurant Jang Su Jang, offers lunch and dinner bento boxes to-go. Boxes come with banchan, a main dish such as bulgogi or bibimbap, and sides like purple rice. Head in to peruse the menu and the cold cases filled with daily offerings.

Han Shin Pocha USA

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Pocha is short for pojangmacha, meaning “tented wagon” or a Korean street food vendor. Han Shin mirrors the feel of a Japanese izakaya with warm woods, rows of tables, and small dining “huts” surrounding the perimeter inside. It’s great for late nights, beer, soju, small bites, and karaoke. Try the smoked pork slices with bean sprouts or the budae jjigae (“army soup”) made with ham, sausage, baked beans, and kimchi or the spicy kimchi hot pot.

Dan Moo Ji

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Head into this popular quick-serve restaurant in Duluth for bites like tteokbokki or spicy rice cakes, Korean fried wings, ramyeon, omurice and kimchi fried rice, and kimbap or a rice and seaweed roll.

Jang Su Jang

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Jang Su Jang or “The Meeting Place” has been a beloved Korean restaurant in Duluth for over ten years. This is the spot to grab dishes with traditional touches like kalbi (barbecue beef short rib), bibimbap, and soondubu-jjigae (tofu stew). Some say the banchan at this restaurant is the best in Atlanta. There’s usually a wait on Friday and Saturday evenings.

가장맛있는족발 족과의동침 Jok Ga A Dong Chim

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This Seoul, South Korea-based chain is a known for its jokbal or pigs feet (trotters) steamed and sliced and served with plenty of banchan. The bossam (boiled pork belly in a kimchi wrap) is quite popular here, too.

Sun & Moon Cafe

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Another Korean pub or pocha like the aforementioned Han Shin, Sun & Moon Cafe is the place for lovers of spicy food. Order the budae jjigae—spicy, sausage stew (“army stew”) or the jukkumi bokkeum (spicy octopus).

Woo Nam Jeong Stone Bowl House

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Located in Seoul Plaza on Buford Highway, Woo Nam Jeong or Stone Bowl House serves traditional Korean fare. Order the haemul pajeon (seafood scallion pancake), kalbi (barbecue beef short rib), or any bibimbap served in a cast iron stone bowl, for which the restaurant is named.

Yet Tuh

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This Korean restaurant in Doraville is where to expect beautifully executed traditional dishes such as bibim guksu, bibimbap, and kimchi stew. Matt Kang, Eater LA editor and host of Eater’s K-Town web series, says Yet Tuh can hold its own against any Korean restaurant in America.

Hae Woon Dae BBQ

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Just outside the perimeter on Buford Highway in Doraville, devoted regulars of this Korean barbecue restaurant swear by its charbroiled pork, short ribs, and slabs of chunky pork bacon. Don’t forget to order some dumplings and buchimgae (Korean pancakes) here, too.

Dish Korean Cuisine

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While many people head to Food Terminal to eat dinner, don’t discount their next door neighbor, Dish Korean. Snack on banchan, then share a seafood pancake, the spicy short rib or stir-fried squid bokkeum, and kimchi fried rice with spam or broth-tossed noodles with clams. The budae jjigae (spicy sausage, spam stew) here is comforting, filling, and totally worth the order. Like burgers? Try the dduck galbhi made with short rib and topped with spicy cabbage and house mayo.

Gaja Korean Bar

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A favorite spot for casual dining and cocktails in East Atlanta Village, Gaja’s menu is a greatest hits of traditional Korean dishes. Favorites here include the scallion pancake, kimchi fried rice, the banchan trio, beef bulgogi, and fried chicken.

Thank U Chicken

Head up to Duluth for Korean fried chicken at Thank U Chicken. It’s totally worth the trek north. While Thank U offers traditional batter-fried chicken on its menu, the standout stars include the soy sauce marinated and the spicy sauce fried birds. An entire chicken here averages around $25. Beer and wine are also available.

Seo Ra Beol

When that Korean barbecue craving hits at 3 a.m., head to Seo Ra Beol in Duluth. The restaurant serves traditional Korean barbecue using charcoal grills. Try the pork belly, beef brisket, and short ribs. Family-style barbecue meals are also available. Seo Ra Beol offers classic dishes beyond its barbecue menu, like bibimbap, hearty and spicy stews, and a seafood pancake.

9292 Korean BBQ

The restaurant uses traditional charcoal table grills rather than electric. The unmistakeable, smokey flavor the grill produces in the meats, along with the quality of the meat used make all the difference. Order the Special #2 with seasoned pork, pork belly, beef short ribs, rib eye, beef bulgogi, and brisket. It comes with banchan (Korean side dishes, including kimchi fried rice).

JS KITCHEN by Jang Su Jang

Looking for really good, super fresh Korean takeout? Catering business and cooking school JS Kitchen, owned by the Shelly Lee of Korean restaurant Jang Su Jang, offers lunch and dinner bento boxes to-go. Boxes come with banchan, a main dish such as bulgogi or bibimbap, and sides like purple rice. Head in to peruse the menu and the cold cases filled with daily offerings.

Han Shin Pocha USA

Pocha is short for pojangmacha, meaning “tented wagon” or a Korean street food vendor. Han Shin mirrors the feel of a Japanese izakaya with warm woods, rows of tables, and small dining “huts” surrounding the perimeter inside. It’s great for late nights, beer, soju, small bites, and karaoke. Try the smoked pork slices with bean sprouts or the budae jjigae (“army soup”) made with ham, sausage, baked beans, and kimchi or the spicy kimchi hot pot.

Dan Moo Ji

Head into this popular quick-serve restaurant in Duluth for bites like tteokbokki or spicy rice cakes, Korean fried wings, ramyeon, omurice and kimchi fried rice, and kimbap or a rice and seaweed roll.

Jang Su Jang

Jang Su Jang or “The Meeting Place” has been a beloved Korean restaurant in Duluth for over ten years. This is the spot to grab dishes with traditional touches like kalbi (barbecue beef short rib), bibimbap, and soondubu-jjigae (tofu stew). Some say the banchan at this restaurant is the best in Atlanta. There’s usually a wait on Friday and Saturday evenings.

가장맛있는족발 족과의동침 Jok Ga A Dong Chim

This Seoul, South Korea-based chain is a known for its jokbal or pigs feet (trotters) steamed and sliced and served with plenty of banchan. The bossam (boiled pork belly in a kimchi wrap) is quite popular here, too.

Sun & Moon Cafe

Another Korean pub or pocha like the aforementioned Han Shin, Sun & Moon Cafe is the place for lovers of spicy food. Order the budae jjigae—spicy, sausage stew (“army stew”) or the jukkumi bokkeum (spicy octopus).

Woo Nam Jeong Stone Bowl House

Located in Seoul Plaza on Buford Highway, Woo Nam Jeong or Stone Bowl House serves traditional Korean fare. Order the haemul pajeon (seafood scallion pancake), kalbi (barbecue beef short rib), or any bibimbap served in a cast iron stone bowl, for which the restaurant is named.

Yet Tuh

This Korean restaurant in Doraville is where to expect beautifully executed traditional dishes such as bibim guksu, bibimbap, and kimchi stew. Matt Kang, Eater LA editor and host of Eater’s K-Town web series, says Yet Tuh can hold its own against any Korean restaurant in America.

Hae Woon Dae BBQ

Just outside the perimeter on Buford Highway in Doraville, devoted regulars of this Korean barbecue restaurant swear by its charbroiled pork, short ribs, and slabs of chunky pork bacon. Don’t forget to order some dumplings and buchimgae (Korean pancakes) here, too.

Dish Korean Cuisine

While many people head to Food Terminal to eat dinner, don’t discount their next door neighbor, Dish Korean. Snack on banchan, then share a seafood pancake, the spicy short rib or stir-fried squid bokkeum, and kimchi fried rice with spam or broth-tossed noodles with clams. The budae jjigae (spicy sausage, spam stew) here is comforting, filling, and totally worth the order. Like burgers? Try the dduck galbhi made with short rib and topped with spicy cabbage and house mayo.

Gaja Korean Bar

A favorite spot for casual dining and cocktails in East Atlanta Village, Gaja’s menu is a greatest hits of traditional Korean dishes. Favorites here include the scallion pancake, kimchi fried rice, the banchan trio, beef bulgogi, and fried chicken.

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